Barber Papers: “Houghton” Fall of 1857

February 17, 2016

By Amorin Mello

~ <strong><a href="http://cdm15932.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/maps/id/8006" target="_blank">Wisconsin Historical Society</a></strong>

Selected letters of the Joel Allen Barber Papers 

… continued from the Summer of 1857.


Sandusky Oct 24th 1857

Dear Son

At length your father and I have both reached this place but how soon we shall be able to leave it is uncertain.  He arrived here last Monday night in a most miserable state.  I did not get here ’till Wednesday morning when I found him much worse than I had supposed he had been, and I believe worse than he had been at any time with his lameness.  He probably exerted himself too much and produced a relapse of his fever and swelling of the limbs.

Giles Addison Barber first came to Wisconsin during the Spring, Summer, and Fall of 1856 to join his sons Augustus Hamilton Barber and Joel Allen Barber.  Augustus died unexpectedly near Ironton – perhaps murdered – before Giles reached them on Lake Superior.  Giles returned to Vermont with a leg ailment from LaPointe.
Both of Joel Allen Barber’s parents came to Wisconsin during the Summer of 1857:  Giles rejoined Allen on Lake Superior while Maria Green Barber stayed in Lancaster with her In-Laws.  Maria and Giles reunited in Sandusky, Ohio, on their way back home to Johnson, Vermont.  Giles’ health had worsened since his 1856 trip there.

He got to Detroit Thursday at night – when he got ashore he found his carpet sack was missing – he being to sick to bring it off himself.  Friday morning he sent round to the hotels to look for it but got no trace and concluded to go without it – but found he was a few minutes too late for the boat.  Saturday morning he went down to the wharf, then the driver pretended, or was told, that the boat would not come and go that morning but at 4 P.M. so he was carried back the house again and paid the scamp 50 cts.  Soon after he saw a bill posted saying the “Bay City” would leave that day at 7 oclock but before he could get to it, they told him it was gone so he was obligated to remain over till Monday.

Michigan Exchange Hotel, circa 1884. ~ Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library.

Michigan Exchange Hotel in Detroit, circa 1884.
~ Burton Historical Collection.

He put up at the Michigan Exchange where he was on the second floor and had to climb stairs until his limb became very lame and considerably swollen the whole length.  He had some fever and no appetite all the way after leaving La P. and probably when he started.  The day after he got here Hamilton procured a Homeopathic Physician who has called to “treat” him every day since.  He had intermitent fever all the time.  Broke a fever every afternoon and night till yesterday and today, when it seems to be leaving him – his appetite is returning.  I think tho he is very weak and can bear but very little food and the of the simplest kind.  The Dr thinks he will get up soon if he can get the pain out of his limbs, but that will probably take some time to conquer.  Says it is probably a rheumatic affliction and might have been produced by taking Quinine.  But he is decidedly better now than three days since – in all respects I believe that had he called an Alopathic Dr, he would surely had a Typhoid fever, but if he is quiet and patient I think he will escape this time.  But I fear it will take a long time for him to recover sufficiently to go home in cold weather.  He had set up a little the last three days but cannot get off nor on the bed without help, and cannot walk without great paid to his limbs – indeed, he has not walked a step since Wednesday.  It has certainly been a very unfortunate season with him and with us all, but I must consider it very fortunate that he has fallen in to so good a place to be be sick, and is in the care of an experienced Homeopathist, who I believe will cure him.

The City of Houghton was located at "Cold Point" aka "Stony Pointe". ~ Detail of Map of Michigan & Part of Wisconsin Territory, Exhibiting the Post Offices, Post Raods, Canals, Rail Roads, &c, by David H Burr, 1839.

Houghton Point aka “Cold Point”,“Stony Pointe” , and “Point Prospect”. 
~ Detail of Map of Michigan & Part of Wisconsin Territory, Exhibiting the Post Offices, Post Roads, Canals, Rail Roads, &c from the 1839 Burr Atlas of Postal Maps.

It is very strange you did not receive any letters from me before father came away as I had sent, certainly three – some of which you may have got before now.  And I got but two short letters from you and none from your father after you left me.  He wrote to Mr Burr when first taken sick and I heard nothing more from him untill one reached us of Oct 3d saying he wished me to meet him at Sandusky as he was too sick to get to L.  Of course, I suffered a good deal of anxiety to know what had become of him and how I was to get home alone – supposing he had gone home without sending me word – I had been so long waiting to hear from him that I had concluded to start in company with Miss Julia Hyde, when I rec’d his letter.

Detail of existing settlements and trails near Houghton Point from the Barber brothers' 1855 survey of Chequamegon Bay.

Detail of early settlements and footpaths near Houghton Point from the Barber brothers’ 1855 survey of Chequamegon Bay. Giles and Allen lived with the Maddocks family during 1856 and 1857 at what is now the Houghton Falls State Natural Area.

The Barbers had lost several capital investments along Lake Superior since 1855, including shipwrecks.  The carpetbag may have held evidence of Augustus’ land and copper claims.
Lysander “Gray Devil” Cutler was hired by the Wisconsin & Lake Superior Mining & Smelting Company during 1857 to resume some of Augustus’ work for them at Ironton and along the Gogebic Iron Range.

I had promised a visit to Mrs. Baker at Janesville, so not knowing how soon he would be here, or that he was much ill then, I concluded to stop there and I started Thursday morning from L – and spent three days at Ja – left there Monday at Midnight – that being the express train expecting to get here the next eve but did not till Wed Morning 4O.C..  There being but no train each day from Toledo to this place.  I got along very well alone – without losing any thing of consequence.  I am afraid that carpet-sack of father’s will never be found tho.  Uncle H has written to some one who was on the boat – whom he knows and perhaps it may come again.  If not it will be one more loss added to the many we have suffered within two years.  When the tide of misfortune will turn with us is yet in the anxious and uncertain future.  I yet hope our lives will all be spared to meet again.  When I left Lancaster many people were having a sort of influence which they called “colds”.  Grandpa – Thode Burr and Mary B. had it and since reaching here Martha has sent a letter saying that Addison – Mame. Lil and Em. in her house – Mother and Lucy – Lib and the two youngest children, and Mary Parker – and Father at Allen’s, Mr. Phelp’s  son quite sick; and about half the people in town had the disease.  I had the good luck to escape it entirely, tho’ I rode to Boscobel in the stage the worst day there has been this fall.  I am afraid we shall not be able to go home without exposing father so much that he will be very sick.  I am sure he cannot recover sufficiently to start with safety in less than four weeks if he has very good luck and no relapse on account of the season.  But if good nursing & good medicine can cure him he will be well before winter.

Plan of Houghton, La Pointe Co., Wisconsin survey & drawing by G.L. Brunshweiler. ~ Wisconsin Historical Society

Plan of Houghton, La Pointe County, Wisconsin, 1858.
~ Wisconsin Historical Society

Aunt Emeline is absent, with Frank at Columbus, but the rest of the family are here and show us every kindness.  This is a most delightful – comfortable and convenient place to be sick in, if one must be sick.  How I wish I could think of our house as possessing half the attractions for a family residence that this does.  But, poor as it is I should be very glad to see it once more and be where I could call it home.

"Survey & Drawing of the town of Houghton by G. L. Brunschweiler, T.E."

“Survey & Drawing of the town of Houghton
by G. L. Brunschweiler, T.E.”

Allen was having difficulties completing his General Land Office contract to finish Augustus’ survey of the LaPointe Band Indian Reservation.  Allen finished his other contract to finish Augustus’ survey of the Apostle Islands earlier in 1857.
$905.47 was paid to Augustus by the General Land Office for completing the survey of Chequamegon Bay.

I am sorry to hear that you have had to wait so long for your money – consequently could not go on with your work.  I do hope you will not try to stay there through the winter unless you are sure of money, and that there will be plenty of provisions to be got at.  What could have been the reason that your money did not come to you?  I did not know that Uncle Sam has suspended payment or lost by the failure of the banks.  Perhaps you did not keep reminding them of your case or give them your “address”.

You must write oftener to me and give me an account of your affairs – of all your pleasures and your pains – your disappointments and vexations and be assured no one can feel a deeper interest or more truely sympathize in all that concerns her you than your affectionate parents.

G. A. Barber and M. G. Barber

Agents for the Town of Houghton, LaPointe County, 1858: "A. W. Maddocks - Houghton, Wis. Charles C. Tucker - Washington, D.C. F. Prentice - Toledo, Ohio."

“A. W. Maddocks – Houghton, Wis.
Charles C. Tucker – Washington, D.C.
F. Prentice – Toledo, Ohio.”

Your father wishes you to say to Mrs. Maddocks that he feels under infinite obligations to her for the kindness shown him while sick at her house – that he wishes to express a thousand times more thanks than he was able, when parting from her in the Steam boat, to do.  I congratulate you on having the privilege of making it your home at so nice and comfortable a place, with such kind people as father describes those to be.  May you have the good fortune or good taste and disposition to make your presence in that, or any other kind hearted family, agreeable – is the wish of your Mother.

Detail of Houghton Falls State Natural Area within the City of Houghton.

Houghton Falls State Natural Area within the Town of Houghton.

Monday morning

Your father rested better last night than before and had no fever thro the night but sweat a good deal as before – is very cool and comfortable this morning.  Has some appetite – does not like to get up as it hurts his limbs.  But much less than when I first came here.

 


Sandusky Nov 1st 1857

Dear Son,

Last sunday I wrote you about your father’s sickness and hope you have rec’d it, or will in good time; but as my letters of the past summer have failed wholey to reach you, perhaps the last has also failed.  I shall continue to write to you often while he continues sick – and unless while navigation lasts and you may direct yours here until the last boat leaves your place as I see no prospects now of your father’s being able to move on for some time to come.  I told you about the chill he had which made me fear he had got a regular chill fever but he did not have another tho he had pretty severe intermittent fever for three days last week. – indeed it continues somewhat yet, but much lighter.  But his lameness is much worse than when he left you – that is – he cannot walk or step because his limbs are so painful and much weaker than when he had more fever.  I believe he would never have got here alive had he not been sustained by tonics and morphine, but they would never have cured him, and I do think that had he fallen too sick to get here and had employed another Alopathist he would have gone into a typhoid fever and probably have died, as did the hon. R.C. Benton Sen. a short time since – at Rockford Ill.  I met his son – our Johnson teacher one at Janesville who told me the sad news. – He was informed of his father’s sickness but did not reach there ’till after his death.  His body was carried to Vt. for interment.

Nov. 2

“George W. Perry, Attorney at Law and Notary Public, Netleton’s Building.”
~ “Business Directory” published in the Superior Chronicle, June 26th, 1855.
George W Perry and others were granted exclusive rights to operate a ferry in Superior City on the St Louis River via Wisconsin law during 1856.
Augustus Barber held a copper claim at what is now Amnicon Falls State Park during the Winter and Spring of 1856.
Allen apparently pawned his “compass”  to a man named Jack for a deposit.
William Herbert was the agent at Ironton for the Wisconsin & Lake Superior Mining & Smelting Company until he was replaced by Lysander Cutler during 1857.
John W Bell akaold Whacken” was an elected official of LaPointe County.

Your father wishes to ask you if you know anything about that Geo Perry concern – the present shape of it.  And if you have heard any thing farther from the Aminacon claim?

Did you get the money of Jack so as to save your compass?  If so – how does it prove?  Has Herbert got home since yet?  If so, how do the boys fare – do they get any money of him?  Does old Whacken let John have his paper?  Do you hear anything from your money?

When father left the boat at Detroit he told the porter to get his Carpet bag in his room and send it ashore with his trunk – showing him the trunk. – but when he got to the Michigan Exchange it was not to be found – neither at that house nor any other in the city.  In looking for it he was detained so as to lose the boat for Sandusky, Friday morning – Saturday he started in a carriage but was told at the wharf by the driver that the boat would not go – (had not arrived) till afternoon, so he was taken back again when soon word came that it had came, but before he could get started – he being unable to walk – it was off again, so he was obliged to stay ’till Monday.

Thus he was detained nearly four days – sick and lame and obliged to climb a long flight of stairs and take long walks to his meals and other necessities, which all together brought on his fever and rheumatism in the muscles worse than ever.  He thinks it almost a miracle that he got through so long a journey – sick as he was when he left you, and without any one to assist or care for him – alive.  His lameness is now in the left limb – the other being quite free from pain when kept in a horizontal position, but both pain him extremely yet if put down so that he does not attempt to step on his feet.  Ham, Jay, and I brought him up stairs last Saturday where we have every thing we need for convenience and family are all as kind and attentive to one wants as people can be.  I do not believe there is any better family, or one happier, than this.  It is two weeks today since father came here and I know not how many more he may have to stay – the prospect looks rather dark for a speedy departure.

Albert McEwen's death during the Fall of 1856 was related to the George Perry concern and the 1856 LaPointe County Election. ~ Journal of the Assembly of Wisconsin, Volume 9, 1857, page 191.

The “Geo Perry concern” related to Albert McEwen’s death and fraud during the 1856 LaPointe County election.  This was investigated by the Wisconsin Assembly.
~ Journal of the Assembly of Wisconsin, Volume 9, 1857, page 191.

We got a letter from Am. Saturday in answer to one from me here, says he is well but I should judge he had not done much this fall but watch and wait for us.  I do not wonder the poor boy is out patience as well as every things else, as he says.

Write often to your afflicted parents.

G.A.B. and M.G.B.


Sandusky Friday Nov 13 – 1857

Dear Son.

You will at once perceive that we are stationary since I wrote you last.  And when we shall be able to move on, is as much a question of uncertainty as ever.  Your father remains sick yet – and I cannot – dare not say that he is even convalescent, tho’ I have a little more courage to think that the medicine now being administered is breaking up his fever.  He has had a most singular sickness – having – as I think – more or less fever – with or without chills every day – probably since he was first taking – certainly since coming here.  [??] the Dr would not acknowledge – or believe it because his visits would be in the forenoon when the intermissions would occur.  But the past week he convinced him that chills and fever do actually exist as he has been [presedest?] to break it up.  His sickness is so unlike anything in the experience of the Dr. that he appears to be entirely mistified with [reward?] to the proper course to pursue.  I have, and do, doubt his judgement – and sometimes have even put a harsher construction upon his course and doubted his honesty.  But he has all along said he had not the least doubt of his ultimate recovery tho it would take considerable time to entirely remove his lameness.  As to that lameness I hardly know what to say.  He is now free from soreness and only his feet swolen; but he cannot straighten his knees as the cords appear to be contracted and are painful when strained and if his feet are brought lower than his body it brings on the same old tearing pain in the muscles.

But I believe that when his fever leaves him and he begins to gain strength his limbs will improve fast.  This week past I have felt more discouraged than ever, as the chills would come on every day about noon – continue an hour – sometimes with a hearty shake – then fever – pulse 120 hr. m. – then a hot sweat most of the night with pulse at 85 at the least pain.

This lasted about 5 days – But the Dr has at length “come in with a Tonic” which appears to work right.  It is the most powerful sweating medicine I ever saw.  He has taken it two nights and one day – and now the 2nd day – 3 P.M. – he has fairly escaped the chill and fever.  I feel greatly encouraged – that he is in a way to recover.  He has all the time been quite confined to his bed except as he could manage to get into a great chair once a day and sit up – from two hours to half an hour – this several days he has not got in the chair as he was unwilling to exert himself so much.  I have been with him – his only nurse – night and day for 3½ weeks, and I hope and expect to granted health and strength to continue to perform the duties of nurse so long as he shall need my assistance.  I cannot but think that he was in just as good condition to receive the medicine, which is working so well over two weeks ago – when the billious fever first left him, as he was two days ago.  But the Dr thought not, as his limbs were so bad then, and it might make them worse.  It has been altogether an unique case, and the Dr has appeared liked one groping in the dark.

I told you in my letter of last week that father lost his carpet-bag – and intended to tell you to see if it was not returned to La Pointe and left there – he thinks the label on it directed there – tho’ at first he said it was to Lancaster.  He can hear nothing from it since and I fear it was stolen by the darkies on the boat.  This has truely been an unfortunate year for us as well as for thousands of others.

Wikipedia.com defines a carpetbagger as: In United States history, a carpetbagger was a Northerner who moved to the South after the American Civil War, during the Reconstruction era (1865–1877). White Southerners denounced them fearing they would loot and plunder the defeated South. Sixty Carpetbaggers were elected to Congress, and they included a majority of Republican governors in the South during Reconstruction. Historian Eric Foner argues: "... most carpetbaggers probably combine the desire for personal gain with a commitment to taking part in an effort "to substitute the civilization of freedom for that of slavery". ... Carpetbaggers generally supported measures aimed at democratizing and modernizing the South – civil rights legislation, aid to economic development, the establishment of public school systems." "Carpetbagger" was a pejorative term referring to the carpet bags (a form of cheap luggage at the time) which many of these newcomers carried. The term came to be associated with opportunism and exploitation by outsiders. The term is still used today to refer to a parachute candidate, an outsider who runs for public office in an area where he or she does not have deep community ties, or has lived only for a short time.

1872 cartoon of Wisconsinite Carl Schurz by Thomas Nast.
 Wikipedia.com definition of a Carpetbagger:
In United States history, a carpetbagger was a Northerner who moved to the South after the American Civil War, during the Reconstruction era (1865–1877). White Southerners denounced them fearing they would loot and plunder the defeated South. Sixty Carpetbaggers were elected to Congress, and they included a majority of Republican governors in the South during Reconstruction. Historian Eric Foner argues:
“… most carpetbaggers probably combine the desire for personal gain with a commitment to taking part in an effort “to substitute the civilization of freedom for that of slavery”. … Carpetbaggers generally supported measures aimed at democratizing and modernizing the South – civil rights legislation, aid to economic development, the establishment of public school systems.”
“Carpetbagger” was a pejorative term referring to the carpet bags (a form of cheap luggage at the time) which many of these newcomers carried. The term came to be associated with opportunism and exploitation by outsiders. The term is still used today to refer to a parachute candidate, an outsider who runs for public office in an area where he or she does not have deep community ties, or has lived only for a short time.

We get nothing yet from you.  Why is it that you remain so silent?  I think it probable we may have to stay here four weeks longer – waiting for him to get well.  You may direct here if you send by return mail or by any boat.

The Panic of 1857 was a precursor to the American Civil War.  It had dramatic impacts across the United States, including Milwaukee and the south shore of Lake Superior.

You cannot know, nor be told the amount of distress in the country this money panic has produced.  I presume you do not see the papers so often as we do, and perhaps do not realize at all.  You father warns you to be careful what you do this winter. – not to meddle with any thing – in Ironton shares – or any kind of property – even if you can buy it for a “song” – Every thing is “dead broke” and the less you have to do with Lake Superior property, the better.

Father sends his best love along with mine to you and his respects to Mrs. Maddocks and family.

I am very sorry to think that you will stay up in that wilderness this winter.  I wish you could get your money – settle up every thing – come down here and go home with us.  It would be a great relief to us to have your assistance for your father if he should continue too lame to walk without help.

We are under a great many obligations to Uncle H. and family for their kindness.

It is growing dark, so good night

Mother


Sandusky Dec 6th 1857

My Dear Son.

Julius Austrian held the federal postal route contract for LaPointe at this time.  John W Bell was the Postmaster there.

Yesterday we rec’d a letter from Am. containing one from you.  I was greatly surprised and grieved to learn that you had not got one of my letters since you left Lancaster.  I have sent you three from there and as many from here.  Neither had you rec’d your draft.  I am really suspicious that some one watches the mails and steals your letters hoping to get money or the draft – which, it is possible he has taken out – forged your name &c and taken the money out.  In such case you might not discover the theft for a long time – and would be subjected to a great deal of trouble in consequence.  I shall have a deal of anxiety in your account this winter, or until I hear that your money has reached you and that provisions are to be had at reasonable prices – which I fear they will and be this since the loss of that new boat must make quite a difference with that region in supplies.

American carpetbag circa 1860; wool with leather handles. ~ Wikimedia.org

American carpetbag circa 1860; wool with leather handles. 
~ Wikimedia.org

I have before written you an account of your father’s journey and continued sickness which you may have yet [??] now.  Lest you have not I will briefly say that he got safely to Detroit where he lost his carpet-sack – was detained there three days – arrived here Monday night 19th ult. Oct. 19th where he has remained ever since, confined to his bed.  The fatigue of the journey probably somewhat increased his lameness which has been very severe, and he has not been entirely free from chills and fever and sweats until the last week.  He has been improving fast for a few days, but just now he is having a little more fever which I presume is caused by some impending diet – either in quantity or quality.

His disease – a very uncommon one – is, in fact, inflamation of the veins extending from the Loins throug the whole limbs – the left much the most – to the toes.  He has not been able to put his feet to the floor without extreme pain since he got here, until the last week, and even now, but a few minutes at a time.  The cords under the knees have been considerably constrainted but are getting relaxed a little so that his legs make nearly straightened, tho he cannot begin to bear his weight on them.

The disease has been so complicated and so badly treated before he got here that the Dr has been very much perplexed with it.  If you have not got my former letters you do not know that we have had a Homeopathist – one whom Uncle H. and Aunt B. think knows enough for all cases but we think that had he possessed a knowledge of anatomy equal to his partner in business who has called twice with him of late, he would have discovered the seat of the disease at first from the symptoms then apparent.  But for four weeks he seemed to be in a state of uncertainty, and baffled at every step.  But since he discovered the seat of it he has treated it with very good success.

Your father is much reduced in flesh and strength.  I cannot now give you a full description of his case but when he gets able to write much I presume he will amuse himself by giving you the particulars if you should feel interested in the subject.  Uncle H and family are very kind and obliging and we have every thing our necesities demand at present, but that does not make me contented to remain so long from home.  I wish to be in my own house, but it is impossible to leave here until he can walk enough to help himself a little.  We have been here 7 weeks, and I fear it will be many more before it will be safe for him to leave or proper for me to leave him for others to wait on.  My health is very good so that no one has had to assist me day or night, in nursing.

Your Aff’nt Mother

I suppose this will never reach you unless I direct to some other person for you.

All well at Lancaster last Sunday.  Monday morning Aunt Lucy saw a fine little daughter added to her family.


Sandusky Dec 18th 1857

Dear Son

Sir Astley Paston Cooper, 1st Baronet (23 August 1768 – 12 February 1841) was an English surgeon and anatomist, who made historical contributions to otology, vascular surgery, the anatomy and pathology of the mammary glands and testicles, and the pathology and surgery of hernia.”
~ Wikipedia.com

You will see that we are here yet, now nearly 9 weeks since I landed here in an almost insensible state from the effects of morphine which I had to take constantly to allay or drown the pain in my limbs.  I have been quite sick much of the time.  Three or four weeks were spent in treating my sore before the [rest seat became?] of my disease was ascertained, since which time there has been steady progress toward health.  My legs had become crooked at the knees, absent at an angle of 45*.  My ankles and feet swollen, white, cold & as useless as though made of putty, but I found the pain that had so long affected them was gone & by much exertion, rubbing &c I got so as to bear any weights, & [thoutes who?] crutches, & I have now got so that I can go twice the width of the house at a time on them.  My appetite has returned & I am gaining rapidly.  My real disease was what is called Spormator [hea?] or a disease of the Spormation vessels or cord on the left side of my body, which the Drs & your Uncle Ham think was the origin of my sickness & all my pain.  Sir Astley Cooper [in thing?] authority, giving all the symptoms of my case.  We hope to be able in a week or two to go home to Vt.  Your mother wants to start in my present helpless condition when I cannot stand alone in a minute without support to save my life, but I have sworn that I will not go to be jostled around & in the can till I am better able to take of my self than now.  I cannot get up or down stairs or sit at all weight with crutches, & as neither of my legs are reliable I assure you it is ticklish business to dare go on them (the crutches).

echo dells at houghton falls state natural area

Echo Dells at Houghton Falls State Natural Area.
~ Shared under Creative Commons from Aaron Carlson © 2011

Coming down the lakes from La Pointe I had a pretty hard time of it, was quite sick, had chills, kept my berth most of the time, & when I got to Detroit I was detained by losing my carpet bag and one thing & another because I was unable to help myself, from Thursday P.M. ill Monday A.M. when I came here.  Lucky that I had such a refuge to [want?] to in my extremity, had I tried to reach home, my life would have paid the forfeit of I might have had a long sickness among strangers without any of the comforts or conveniences I now enjoy, and insured an enormous train of affection.

Map inset of Chequamegon Bay with Houghton, LaPointe, Bayfield, Ashland, and Bay City.

Map inset of Chequamegon Bay with Town of Houghton, LaPointe, Bayfield, Ashland, Bay City, and the LaPointe Indian Reservation.

We get letters from Amherst occasionally, he is well & in good spirits boarding at Mr Griswolds, is very anxious for our return to Vermont.  By him I learn that Ambrose Chase died after about an hour illness in Nov, & that John Burcham of Johnson died still more suddenly being found dead in the privy.  Old Mr Dorsker died lately & that is all he has told of to us.  On opening my new trunk here I find some books are missing.  Who do you suppose is the rogue?  I hope he will russ some amusements & instruction from the books, if so I am content.

Portrait and biography of Frederick Prentice, the "first white child born in ... Toledo." ~ History of the Maumee Valley by Horace S Knapp, 1872, pages 560-562.

Frederick Prentice (“Man of Money and Mystery”) was an “Indian interpreter for Indian agents and traders”, and owned extensive properties in the Chequamegon Bay region during the 1850s. Prentice started the City of Houghton around the same time he cofounded Bay City (Ashland) during 1854, purchased the Buffalo Tract (Duluth) from Benjamin Armstrong during 1856, and cofounded the City of Houghton (near Washburn) during 1857.  Prentice returned to Houghton in 1887 and organized the Prentice Brownstone Company, becoming “the most famous quarryman in northern Wisconsin”. Houghton had a population of about 250 people, a school house and a sawmill with 25,000 foot capacity” by 1888. 
~ This portrait and a profile of Frederick Prentice (the “first white child born” in Toledo, Ohio) is available from History of the Maumee Valley by Horace S Knapp, 1872, pages 560-563.

Frederick Prentice‘s legacy along Chequamegon Bay at Apostle Island quarries, the Obelisk in Washburn, and Prentice Park (Wiikwedong aka Equadon) in Ashland.  
Hiram Hayes, Clerk of Superior, No. 4 Third Street.”
~ “Business Directory” published in the Superior Chronicle, June 26th, 1855.
The Barbers had difficulty securing their copper claim at Amnicon Falls State Park with the General Land Office in Superior City.
Bayfield Mercury
August 22nd, 1857
John H Osborn,
Banker and Land Agent,
And Dealer in Exchange, Superior, Wis.
REFERENCES, — J. B. Ramsay & Co., Cincinnati; J. R. Morton & Co., do; E. Jenkins & Son, Baltimore; A. R. Van Nest & Co., N. Y.; Heston & Druckla, Phila; Holiday & Coburn, St. Louis; John H. Richmon, Esq., Maysville, Kentucky.”
 John H Osborn was married to Samantha Butterfield, who may have been related to Captain Steven Butterfield near the City of Houghton.

Have you recd your draft yet?  Was your compass saved to you?  Have you got at work on the reservation yet?  If so how do you prosper?  How does Herbert make it, does he still remain agent?  Does he sell any shares, if so, for how much?  Is the work still going on at the City of Houghton, or has the news of the general crash and prostration of all kinds of business failed of reaching Stony PointeI recd a letter from Prentiss last week who says, there are some going from Toledo next spring to live there, & he appeared to feel as well as ever.

He said he sent 50 bbls Ham & a lot of Pork to Detroit to go up, but it arrived too late for the last boat to Lake Superior.  I have written to Hayes that if the Ammanicon case is decided against me to take an appeal to Washington at once & I will go there & see if testimony has been supplied or any unfair things have been done by the clerks in the office.

I have now sat up [little?] hours, read Douglas’ speech & written this much to you but I feel that I have over taxed my powers and must go to my heated bed for rest.  Douglas has come out against the Administration policy toward Kansas & will make a split in the party not easily healed.  I will send you his speech.

Tell Mr. Maddock’s folks that Judge John Fitch of Toledo was shot yesterday [????] once of his family by one T.G. Mellon, the ball entering his mouth, lodging in the back of his neck, some hopes are entertained of his life.  If this is a ½ sheet it is as long as your letters.  Be careful of yourself.  I remain your affectionate father.

G.A. Barber

Give my respects to Mr & Mrs Maddocks, & to John Cosborn.

1857 Milwaukee &amp; Horicon Railroad detail of Chequamegon Bay

Detail from the 1857 Township map of Wisconsin showing The Milwaukee & Horicon Rail Road and its connections. The town-sites of LaPointe County shown here are Ironton, Boyd’s at Old Fort (mislabeled as “La Pointe”), Bay City, Ashland, and Houghton (mislabeled here as “Bayfield” and later as “Lower Bayfield” in the 1865 Colton Atlas).  The railroad shown on the LaPointe Indian Reservation correlates to Barber/Wheeler/Stuntz details from the Gardens.
~ Library of Congress


To be continued in the Winter of 1858

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